How to Keep Your Marketing Emails Out of Your Subscribers’ Spam Folders

How-to-Keep-Your-Marketing-Emails-Out-of-Your-Subscribers-Spam-Folders - Macaulay Gidado

Many businesses incorporate email marketing in their promotional and marketing strategy. But very few are seeing tangible results.

Why is that?

The simplest and most reasonable answer is that your targeted audience isn’t engaging with your emails. And when a subscriber doesn’t find your emails engaging, the easiest way to get rid of you is to mark one of your emails as spam. Then straight to the spam folder all of your subsequent emails will go. You obviously don’t want that. It would defeat the purpose of sending out marketing emails in the first place.

What can you do about this?

Simple. Give your emails a better chance with your audience by trying out these powerful tips.

Ask Yourself The Following Vital Questions

The first step to solving a problem is by identifying its cause. Therefore, ask yourself these questions:

  • Are my subscribers’ email provider diverting my emails to spam?
  • Are my emails delivering or not? Find out by checking your deliverability and spam score using this tool.
  • Do your subscribers think you are spamming them? This typically happens when your subscribers don’t find your email content engaging enough, when your emails arrive too frequently, or when they are too focused on making sales.
  • Are people unsubscribing from your mailing list?
  • Are your subscribers marking your emails as spam?

Remember that merely identifying a problem doesn’t magically solve it. Don’t just ask questions. Don’t just try to identify the causes of your email marketing failure. You need to address and solve the problem. Otherwise, your email marketing campaigns will keep failing.

Try Email Content Filtering

This simply helps your filter both your outbound mails so as to help you avoid dispatching spammy emails, depending on your filtering parameters. When you don’t send out spammy emails, you lower the chances of your emails getting tossed into the spam folder. Services like Every Cloud Tech will even help you generate reports detailing how your emails fares out there.

Don’t Hide the Unsubscribe Link or Button

You might think that hiding the unsubscribe button or making it difficult to find will help you lower the rate at which you lose subscribers. But trust me, it’s a mistake. It would only frustrate subscribers. And when frustration sets in, the easiest way out is to toss the email causing that frustration into the spam folder–problem solved.

Why is this bad?

When a user marks your email or address as spam, their email service provider (ESP) automatically begins to divert subsequent emails from your address into the user’s spam folder. Now, when a lot of users under the same ESP mark your email or address as spam, the ESP could blacklist your address. This means the ESP will begin pushing emails from you into everyone’s spam folder. That’s including the spam folders of people that are actually interested in your emails.

Therefore, always make the unsubscribe button visible and easy to find.

Avoid Sending Emails to Non-Subscribers

Mining the web for email addresses is a shady strategy scammers and spammers use. Therefore, avoid sending newsletters or marketing emails to people that don’t want them. Doing so would only undermine your brand’s reputation and increase the chances of your emails landing in the spam folder. Also avoid sending emails to people that have already unsubscribed from your list.

Use a Reputable Hosting Service to Improve Your Email Marketing

Where do you host your email server? Make sure the IP address is not blacklisted by top email service providers–learn more here. Better still, use a reputable hosting services.

The above-mentioned tips may not entirely save your email marketing campaign. But they will go a long way in increasing your chances of finding success. They will help you keep your marketing emails from your subscribers’ spam folders.

Five Powerful Ways to Drive Engagement on Your Website

When running a website (whether a personal or a business website), the main goals are usually lead generation, conversion, and sales. However, whatever leads your site manages to generate would translate to nothing without engagement. Thus, conversion and sales via the site would remain elusive.

The question is: why engagement?

One answer to that is ‘to beat competition’. No matter how small your niche is, you will always be faced with competition. Statistics show that there are over 966million websites online today, and they are all clamouring for attention. This brings us to the second reason engagement is paramount.

Considering the mantle of information online today and how easily accessible it is, the attention spans of internet users have become meagre and fleeting at best. This makes it essential that your website begins to engage your visitors as soon as they land on it. Otherwise, you risk losing them a few seconds afterwards.

How then can you drive engagement?

The answer is simple. Do everything you can to make your website useful, informative, compelling, user-friendly, and attention-grabbing. Here are five ways you can do that.

Make Your Website Speedy

Apart from the fact that page load speed is a major Google ranking factor, it can also affect your bounce rate. This is because no one wants to spend their precious time waiting for a slow site to load. The longer your site visitors have to wait idly for your pages to load, the more disengaged they would become. One survey discovered that nearly a half of web users will abandon a site if it takes more than 3 seconds to load.

Therefore, why not do yourself, your site, and your brand a favour and seek out and apply as many strategies for improving page load speed as possible? Some of them include choosing the right web hosting package, using a minimalistic design, optimising your images, and compressing your files using Gzip.

Make It Responsive

In this age when the majority of the world’s population carries a mobile device in their pocket wherever they go, in this age when smart TVs are becoming increasingly popular, it’s very important that your website is optimised for both mobile devices and high-resolution screens. Responsiveness means that your site is designed to format and display well on various devices. This makes it user-friendly on all platforms, making it easy for visitors to engage with your content.

If you don’t have the resources to hire a designer/programmer that can design your site to be responsive, you could go for a website-building package like the ones offered at freeparking.co.nz/websites/. The great thing about these site builders is that they make your site automatically responsive, they are cheap, and you don’t need prior coding knowledge to use them.

Make Your Navigations User-Friendly

This means making your site easy to navigate. Users love it when they don’t have to work hard to discover what they are looking for on your site. Thus, navigations that are well-structured, simple, and easy to find can go a long way in keeping your visitors comfortably browsing through your pages and even encourage them to take an action that results in sales.

Also pay attention to proper integration of internal linking and use of calls-to-action.

Tailor Compelling Content

Typically, people visit websites in search of information. The problem is that information is everywhere online. Why should they digest yours? What makes yours stand out? When you don’t address these questions, you risking publishing unremarkable content on your site and thus driving your leads away.

Here are some things you can do to ensure your content is engaging:

  • Be original. Don’t copy. Think out of the box. Always find an angle that hasn’t been explored.
  • Make your content informative. Everything you write should count.
  • Use evocative images in your posts.
  • Catchy headlines are great.
  • Use short paragraphs. They are easy on the eye.
  • Backup your points with citations.
  • Try various post formats–text, info-graphics, videos, how-to posts, and so on.
  • Be humorous when you can.
  • Tell a story and favour conflict.

Find out more on creating compelling content for your website here.

Always Interact with Your Audience

Engagement is all about communication and involvement. You can’t hope to engage your audience if you don’t interact with them. Don’t simply publish your post and then dust your hands. Read the comments your posts generate and reply to them when necessary.

People relish recognition. It’s that simply. And when you reply to comments on your site, not only are you letting your visitors know that you recognise them, you also engage them by answering their questions, offering further information, and acknowledging their contributions.

There are many other ways you can drive engagement on your website. Check this out. You can start with the five mentioned above and work your way to other tips across the internet. Do this and you will see your engagement and brand loyalty improve.

Protecting Your Personal Brand Online: Important Things You Need to Know

Protecting your personal online brand

Gone are the days when business owners and corporations are the only entities faced with protecting their online brands. That’s a truth that can’t be disputed. Individuals now need to protect their personal brand.

Of course, it’s easy to imagine that, since you don’t own a business, there’s no brand to protect. However, instead of imagining, first try to understand what a personal brand and brand security mean. How their absences can affect his or her personal life.

Personal Online Brand

Your personal online brand is your public image online. That is, what you represent online. How people perceive you online. It’s your online visibility. Your online authenticity. Your online authority. It’s that name you use across all online channels. It’s the opinion you share on various web platforms.

Online Brand Security

Online brand security, on the other hand, is all about protecting that image. It’s all about plugging all holes via which an unauthorised person can leverage or hijack your brand (or some aspects of it) as their own. Usually, such a person would be looking to achieve a dubious goal with your brand. Perhaps, one that profits them, harms your online reputation or presence, or even hurts you as a person.

Therefore, while you may not have a corporate brand to protect, there are still your online handle and image. If you think nobody could be interested in stealing them, then think again. The threats to a brand can come in many forms:

  • As a desperate corporate competitor looking for an edge over you.
  • A cyber squatter.
  • A scammer.
  • Even as a spammer.
  • It could even be someone that answers the same name as you trying to establish their own online brand. This can be especially damaging if the person posts ideas that go against your values.
  • Or as your abuse of the internet. For instance, what you post on social media today can hurt you tomorrow.

There are many other possibilities. And if one doesn’t poke a hole in your online image, another might.

Why Do You Need Personal Online Brand Security?

  • About 48% of recruiters check their prospective employees’ personal websites before deciding whether to hire or not.
  • Even if you have no need for a personal online brand today, chances are that the need will arise in the future. For instance, an aspiring writer could become a popular professional author tomorrow. It’s only reasonable to secure your name across all channels from the onset.
  • About 63% of recruiters use social media to learn more about prospective employees.
  • Secure your online name against cyber squatters.
  • Protect yourself from scammers.
  • Protect yourself from competitors.
  • About 8% of companies have laid off an employee because the employee abused social media

Hence, if your personal online brand is compromised, so might your chances at some great online and offline business or employment opportunities.

How to Protect Your Personal Brand Online

Secure Your Domain Name

Since you are looking to secure your personal brand, it’s ideal to choose a domain name that is closely related to your legal name. If possible, use your legal name. Thus, if your name is John Lock, then use JohnLock.com or something close to that.

Depending on your resources, it’s also ideal to register variations of the name or the same name under top domain extensions. Example, [dot]net, [dot]co.uk, and [dot]org. This will tightly distinguish and protect your personal brand from other people answering the same name.

You can also register free subdomains with WordPress and Blogger. It doesn’t matter that you might not use them. This will help prevent someone else from stealing your identity there.

Build a Personal Website or Blog

There are many reasons you need a personal website or blog as a way of protecting your personal brand online. Here are the major ones.

  • It’s a way to build your authority online. When you run a personal blog, and share original, compelling content—your expertise and experiences—you create awareness about yourself, people get to know you, and with time you could become established as an influencer.
  • You offer yourself a better chance at landing business and employment opportunities.
  • You increase your visibility on search engines and put your name out there. Hence, when people, an employer or a potential business associate, google your name, you site appears. This can be especially beneficial when there are many other people online answering the same name as you.

Secure Your Social Media Handles

Be sure to register your social media accounts using your legal name or something close to that as your username. It’s recommended that you use the same username across all channels. That’s including in your domain name. If you have multiple domain names, one of them should reflect your social media username.

Social media sites like Facebook and LinkedIn may allow you to answer the same profile name as another user. But then your username must be unique. And that’s what you should focus on securing. To simultaneously check for the availability of your legal or chosen name as a username on multiple social media sites, use this tool.

If there are social media platforms you don’t want to use, you can prevent someone else from registering your username. Simply create accounts on the sites for the sake of locking the username down.

Interconnect Everything

A very important way to establish and protect your personal brand online is by interconnecting all your online accounts. For instance, connecting all your domains to your website and connecting your social media accounts to your website and vice versa. That way, people can find your website via your social media profiles. Or your social media pages via your website. It’s a powerful way of showing your authenticity.

Select the Domain Privacy Option

When you register a domain, your personal information (that is, your phone number, address, email address, fax…) is publicly listed on the WHOIS directory. Other info like your domain registration and expiry dates is also listed publicly. This means that anybody can easily find your personal info by running a search for your domain name on the directory.

This exposes you to many security issues:

  • Scammers and spammers looking to take advantage of you and your personal brand.
  • You become vulnerable to identity theft.
  • Domain hijackers looking to take over your domain name.
  • It becomes easy for stalkers to find your personal information.

To protect your identity, simply elect the domain privacy option. That way, your registrar will have dummy domain registration info, instead of your true personal details, published on the WHOIS directory.

Finally, never stop researching more ways to build and secure your brand online. Because as the years go by, new threats will sprout. And you want to be ready for them. Leave nothing to chance.

How to Design and Develop a Great Brand Identity

Last time, we talked about what brand identity is and isn’t. You can read the post here.

Talking about brand identity without mentioning ‘design’ is like talking about a building without including its foundation. This doesn’t mean that brand identity ends in design. As a matter of fact, it doesn’t.

The job of a great brand identity is to shape a business or product into a persona consumers agree with. Therefore, a brand identity has to engage all five senses when possible in order to create the perfect impression and incite the right feeling.

  • Sound? Think of the sound that plays you turn on your Windows computer. When you hear that sound coming from another room, it makes you think of Microsoft windows even without you seeing the origin of the sound. That’s branding.
  • Smell? When last did someone pass you by and the person’s scent made you think of a perfume brand or even a friend that wears the same perfume? That’s branding. Another example, one petrol station mini-mart increase coffee sales by 300% by pumping the smell of coffee near its gas pumps. That’s branding.
  • Taste? Pick any three wine brands with the same ingredients and taste them. Why do you think they taste different?
  • Touch? Have you ever bought a coat, a dress, or even a duvet because of house it feels when you touch it?
  • Sight? This is where design comes in. In the case of a wine business, design as a branding tool can range from the wine label and the shape of the bottle to the wine company’s website and logo?

Any of the above mentioned senses can be factored in when developing your brand identity, depending on what your business is about. However, design is the most popularly used branding tool because of its versatility. And we are going to focus on that.

Developing Your Brand Design

To develop your brand design, you need to start with the basics. When you get seamingly tiny aspects of design like fonts and colours right, every other thing falls in place.

Typography

This is the font (or set of fonts) you select for your branding materials. Typically, you can choose from four main typography categories. Check below.

Serif Fonts. These are fonts like Garamond and Time New Roman. They seem a bit old school and traditional, but they are the perfect fonts to use when you are looking to incite trust.

Sans Serif Fonts. These are fonts like Franklin Gothic and Helvetica. Unlike Serif Fonts, the letters have smooth edges and are ideal if you are looking to give your brand a more modern and sleek feel.

Script Typography. This category imitates cursive handwriting and include fonts like Pacifico and Allura. They make for a more feminine or luxurious feel in designs.

Display Fonts. These fonts are perfect when you are looking to make a bold statement–something not easily forgotten. Metallica’s lightning bolt font is a great example of display font.

Now that we have acquainted you with the four main categories of typography, be mindful as you choose one, as whichever typography you go with will go a long way in determining how people perceive your brand.

Colour Palette

Next on the list of design attributes you need to worry about as you develop your brand identity is colour palette.

Believe it or not, colours are just ordinary. Each colour, depending on your culture or side of the world, denotes something. This means that when people see a certain colour, certain image, feeling, thought etc comes to mind. For starters, let’s take a look at the most common colours, what they denote, and how you can use that knowledge to your advantage as you develop your brand identity.

  • Black can be incorporated in your designs to give your brand a modern touch or a tinge of sophistication.
  • Brown: when you are looking to stand out from the crowd, this could be the colour to use, if only because it’s rarely used in branding. Brown may also be used to convey masculinity or ruggedness.
  • Pink. This is the mother of gender stereotypes. In most cultures, it is associated with femininity. If your target audience is women, this can be an ideal colour to incorporate in your branding designs.
  • Purple: This colour is often used to portray royalty. Thus, it might work for you when you are looking to give your brand a luxurious feel.
  • Blue: this is a colour that appeals to most people. It’s easily accepted by both genders. Perfect for when you are looking to appeal to a wide demographic, it can make your brand seem more trustworthy and stable.
  • Green calls to mind ‘money’ and ‘nature’ in most cultures. If your brand has to do with wealth or eco-friendly products, this might be the perfect colour to use.
  • Orange: This is often used to denote friendliness and playfulness. Use it when your brand is looking to exude those feelings.
  • Yellow makes most people think of sunshine. It’s the colour of happiness and cheerfulness. It can be the ideal colour to use when you want to portray your brand as fun, affordable, and accessible.
  • Red. This is the colour of excitement and passion. Do you want a youthful or loud brand identity? Red might be the perfect choice.

Shapes & Lines

Just like colours, shapes can incite various reactions in people. For instance, a person’s reaction to circle will most likely be entirely different from their reaction when they see a triangle. By researching the various reactions surrounding certain shapes, you can integrate a shape in your design to inspire a designed reaction with your brand.

  • Round shapes, for instance, often inspire feelings of love and unity.
  • Straight edged shapes like squares and triangles, on the other hand, can inspire a feeling of trustworthiness and stability, since they generally denote efficiency and strength.
  • Straight Lines too have their own connotations. While horizontal line can convey peace and calm, vertical lines often depict strength and masculinity. So pay attention to them as you develop your brand identity.

Designing Your Brand Identity

Now that you understand the foundation of your design, it’s time to choose your design assets and then work with a designer to bring them and your brand identity to life. Of course, the design assets you select should be dependent on the nature of your business. Below are the most commonly used design assets:

Your Logo

This is a must have design asset for every business. You should aim for a logo that achieve the following:

  • Make a memorable impression on your prospects.
  • Conform with your industry’s standards.
  • Favour a classic feel over a trendy one, as you don’t want a logo that could go out of fashion in a few months.
  • Is simple, uncluttered, and neat. In order words, visually appealing.
  • Clearly conveys your identity and value as a business.
  • Comes in various formats (JPEG, PNG, etc) and multiple sizes
  • Has a black and white version

Learn more about designing a great logo. https://99designs.com/blog/tips/how-to-design-logo/

Your Website

This is another vital design asset worth making part of your brand identity, especially in this digital age. This is where consumers find information about your business online. If you run an online business or sell digital products, not having a website or at least a landing page is like trying to fill a gallon without a funnel. You will end up missing out leads that could propel your business to success.

Learn more about building a website.

Your Product Packaging

Whether you sell products or services online or offline, how you present that product to consumers can make or mar its success in the market. They say don’t judge a book by its cover, but unfortunately that’s exactly worth people do. Therefore, never neglect your product packaging. Ensure that the designer you use gets it right.

Business Cards

This might sound a bit old fashioned, but trust me business cards are still in vogue. The best part is that you can reinforce your branding and the message you want to get across to consumers by having a stock up of business cards to give out. Who knows. A long lost customer could come calling simply because you gave them a way to reach you–a business card.

Remember to keep the design of your business card simple. The card should also have your logo and important contact details.

Your Email Design

If a website or landing page design number in your list of design assets, then so should an email design. Email marketing can become a means of reaching out to your customers once in a while to promote both old and new products or even educate about your company. While you are at it, remember that a simple design is better than a cluttered one. Also, stunning images can go a long way.

Your Branding Style Guide

This is a document that shows your design assets and how to use them. It can serve as a blueprint for your brand identity to ensure that future designs conforms to your original brand identity and inspires the desired perception among your prospects.

Now that You have learnt the most basic aspects of creating design assets for your brand identity, it’s time to reach out to a designer and give your business the best brand identity it can get.

What Brand Identity Is and Isn’t

What brand identity is and isn't - Macaulay Gidado

Before we dive into the topic brand identity, let’s try a more familiar question: what makes up your public image?

A typical answer can entail a host of things, from your sense of fashion to how you behave in public. These all come together to make up your public image or personal identity.

Brand Identity is similar, although it involves more conscious decisions. It’s simply the marketing elements and practices that shape your business’ public image (your brand).

Before we go forward, it’s worth noting that ‘brand identity’ isn’t the same thing as ‘brand’, as is obvious above. Neither is it the same thing as ‘branding’. The three terms are very different even though they are often interchangeably misused.

Let me explain.

  • Your brand is your business’ public image. That is, how people perceive your business. Sometimes, perception can be false. Kind of like how some celebrities drive very flashy cars, even though they are dead broke. Thus, a brand is sometimes not how a business looks on the inside. It’s simply how it looks on the outside. It’s simply a public image.
  • Brand Identity, on the other hand, is that selection of elements that make up your brand (your desired public image). For instance, take the James Bond character as a brand. Some of the brand elements that make up that brand would thus be: a dark fitting tuxedo, a pair of shiny Oxfords, a clean-shaven face, a Rolex watch, a fast sophisticated car, and a healthy dose of confidence.
  • And finally Branding is all about actively promoting a business or a particular product through advertising and distinctive design. Branding is simply where your brand identity and marketing meet.

Why do entrepreneurs have to worry about brand identity?

Well, I will tell you why. It’s all about perception. You are either in control of how people perceive your business or you are not. Brand identity helps you be in control.

How to Develop a Brand Identity that Works

The foundation of brand identity resides in design as found in elements like your logo, the packaging of your product, your business website, your paid media, and so on. But before you jump into design assets, you need to first reflect on your business. Otherwise, you could end up creating a brand identity that falls apart once your brand is out there in the world.

Look Within

Lots of brands out there are false public images. You don’t want to be one of them as you would be setting yourself up for failure in the future.

Therefore, in trying to develop your brand identity, look within. Ask yourself these questions:

  • What’s my mission? That is, why did you start your business?
  • What’s my values? What beliefs and values do you as a company identify with?
  • How is your company any different from other companies in your niche?
  • Is your company special? How?
  • In three words, how would you want people to describe your business?
  • If your business had a voice, what would it say and how would it say it?

Answer these questions and the picture of the public image you are trying to build for your business will become much clearer to you. Now, let’s do something else.

You As an Outsider

Remember we defined ‘brand’ as how people perceive a particular business. I want you to think of yourself as one of those people–you know, as a potential consumer.

Now, be honest. As an outsider, what do you think of the business you are trying to build? The image you have in your head, is it a good one? Does it match the public image you desire for your company?

Don’t panic if it doesn’t. It just means you have work to do.

Check back next week to learn how to shape your brand through design.

Seven Important Questions to Ask Your Prospective Social Media Manager

Seven important questions to ask your prospective social media manager - Macaulay Gidado

Over the years, social media has grown to become a vital aspect of online marketing. It’s no longer just a place for people to make friends, share ideas, talk about what they ate the previous night, and so on. It is now also an avenue for content marketers, brands, salespeople to reach out to consumers in the hope of inspiring engagement and generating leads.

No wonder you want to hire a social media manager to help you leverage the marketing opportunities social platforms offer.

Unfortunately, it’s not everyone that claims to understand social media marketing that actually has what it takes to pull a social networking campaign off. This is why, in your bid to hire a social media manager, you ought to ask every potential candidate that comes your way these important questions.

What Social Media Platforms Do You Recommend?

You are asking this question with the expectation that, as a skilled professional, the candidate has already researched your company’s niche and its social media marketing potentials. If they haven’t done that, then the interview should end here.

Also, the answers you get don’t matter as much as the reasons behind them. If a candidate mentions Facebook, the ‘why’ behind that reply is what you want to know.

What Two Social Marketing Metrics Are Worth Monitoring?

The candidate should be very conversant with inciting ‘engagement’. Companies thrive on engagement. They must be skilled at creating social media content that arouses conversations about a business and among any audience. Also, they ought to have handled social campaigns in the past and successfully generated leads.

This is where their experience and past successes bare themselves. From their reply you should notice whether or not they can help your company incite engagement and generate leads.

What’s the Difference Between Social Marketing and Social Customer Service?

Your candidate should be able to sail through this question. It’s not very different from asking the difference between marketing and customer service.

The former is about planting a purchase thought in (prospective) customers’ minds. Then guiding that thought—and, hence, the customers—to the point where they make orders. The latter requires the ability to manage customers’ grievances on social media platforms. Mind you, social networking sites are where consumers express themselves the most. So if you can’t put a lid on a complaint there, it will definitely escalate.

How Would You Manage a Social Reputation Crisis?

News, especially bad ones, spread like wildfire. Social media platforms only fuel the spread. Your prospective social media manager should be able to contain the crisis.

A candidate who has handled such a crisis before would be more experienced than one who hasn’t. Whether experienced in reputation crisis management on social media or not, they should be able to detail down steps they would follow to get your company out of such a crisis, should it arise in the future.

How Would You Distribute Resources for a Social Marketing Campaign?

Available resources can entail time, manpower, finance, and so on. Your candidate ought to be familiar with social media marketing strategies that can help them manage the resources available to them.

When is advertising on Twitter better than using Google AdWords? What percentage of a budget should go into a Facebook campaign and how much should go into YouTube ads, and why? How would they monitor and determine the success of an ad campaign?

These and more are issues they have to address.

What Social Media Channels Have You Managed?

Your candidate should be able to point you to professional content they have written. Study their blogs, social media profiles, past achievements and, possibly, failures. Weigh their content. Does it suite the various platforms on which it appears? Is it compelling? Is it SE optimised?

What Would Be Your Goal If We Hired You?

People often mistake the number of Facebook fans or Twitter followers they have as their true audience. But followers and fans don’t carry much weight unless you are able to engage them. A thousand Twitter followers that lead to ten sales is better than a million that lead to no sales.

When you ask about your candidate’s goal for your company, the answer you want to hear shouldn’t simply be about number of fans or followers. It should be more about engagement. About likes, replies, comments, and about conversion.

Also ask how the candidate plans on attaining that goal of theirs.

Remember, whoever you hire as your social media manager becomes the online voice of your brand. Definitely you want someone who understands what you do or sell; someone who is passionate about your business; someone creative and innovative.

Hopefully, the aforementioned questions will help you make the right choice. You could also checkout our other blog post on social media marketing for more tips.

Seven Things You Can Do with Your Domain Name

Seven things you can do with your domain name - Macaulay Gidado

When people say they need a domain name, the first thought that comes to mind is, “they want to set up a website”. While that may be appropriate, a domain name can do much more. Are you holding off on registering a domain name? Perhaps because you are not quite sure what to do with it? Here are seven ways you can use it.

Secure Your Online Identity with a Domain Name

Cyber-squatters and domain investors are getting more desperate to make money online every day. Securing your online identity has never been more important. You may not need a website for yourself or company today (very unlikely). But you most certainly will in the future. Registering your ideal domain name now will save you the headache and cost of acquiring it tomorrow from any domain investor who beats you to it.

Also, if you own a company, then securing your domain name become paramount. You might also want to secure similar names relevant to your brand. This will protect you from competitors or traffic hijackers looking to divert some of your customers or site visitors to their websites.

Even if you aren’t currently making use of the domain name, you can let it sit there, until you are ready to use it. This is referred to as domain parking.

Make Money Through Monetized Parking of Your Domain Name

People sometimes confuse domain parking and monetized domain parking. With domain parking, you simply register a domain name without using it. But with monetized parking, you opt in for your registrar to set up a dummy webpage for your domain name and list adverts targeting type-in traffic to the domain.

Making tangible money with monetized parking is not as easy as advertised online. Going with the meaning of ‘type-in traffic’, your domain name should be a popular keyword or keyword phrase. One people are likely to type into the URL bar out of curiosity or when searching for a website related to the keyword. Example: people.com. Your domain can also be a misspelling like twtter.com. The goal is capture people searching for twitter.com, but who omitted the “i” by mistake.

In any case, the number of such domain names you register will also count towards how much you make from monetized domain parking.

Sell Your Domain

Many people are into domain investing. And it’s extremely profitable for those that understand the mechanics. It involves registering domain names you believe will be in demand in the future. It also involves a bit or a lot of waiting. After which you then sell the domains off to whoever is willing to pay the price you want.

While many domain investors make hundreds or thousands of dollars on a single name, some great domain names go ahead to land their owners deals worth tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars—sometimes even millions.

If you have some domain names you want to sell, here is how you go about doing it.

Set Up a Website

This is the major reason for domain name registration. When someone types in your domain name into the URL bar of their browser, your website is what they should find. It doesn’t matter what type of website. It can be:

  • A blog, where you share regular compelling content about a topic in which you are an expert.
  • An ecommerce website where you sell products online.
  • A company website where you display information about your company and your product or service, generate leads, and relate with your customers.
  • A personal website with info about you (this can come in the form of an author website, an online resume, even a virtual business card listing where you can be found online and offline, and so on).

You can set up a website at your domain by selecting a webhosting plan.

Setup a Personalised Email Address

Have you have ever wanted an email address that says @yourname.com? Perhaps for your personal use or for your business? You must have at a point wondered how to procure it. Well, it all starts with you registering a domain name that equally says yourname.com. Whether you set up such an email via your domain registrar or Google app, there is no denying that it will make you appear professional to whomever sees your email in their inbox.

The best part is that you can even set up as many email addresses as you want at that domain.

Forward Your Domain

There are many applications for this. You can forward your domain name to your website, Facebook page, twitter timeline, or to some other social media profile. This is especially handy when you have high-traffic domain names you simply don’t want to park. Instead of letting the traffic waste, you redirect it to any webpage of yours that needs it.

To forward a domain, simply login to your domain account manager, select the domain you want to forward, input the URL of the page you want it forwarded to, save, and you are done.

Lease Your Domain

This is another alternative when you don’t want to sell your domain name. However, it’s not a very popular one. Even so, if you find someone that is willing to pay monthly or yearly to host a website on your domain, by all means enjoy the opportunity. With leasing your domain, you can eat your cake and have it. But your domain must be a hot cake (commands much traffic or benefits whatever the renter wants to do with it) for anyone or company to want to lease it.

Just make sure that your contract with this person clearly states what they can’t use the domain for, as you don’t want them jeopardising its value by doing something illegal or something that may get it blacklisted by bodies like Google. The contract should also include the conditions under which any of you can terminate the lease.

These are the major ways you can utilise your domain name. Here are other alternatives, although most of them fall under the abovementioned ones. Learn more about domain names here.